New Guidelines for PA Notary Stamps: Order New Notary Stamps Today!

Do you work as a notary public in Pennsylvania, or are you training to be one? If so, we want to make sure you’re aware of the major changes instituted by the Revised Uniform Law on Notarial Acts (RULONA), which will take effect on October 26th, 2017. For a full summary of the new law, click here.

Naturally, at Rubber Stamp Station, we’re interested in the changes coming to the official PA notary stamp. The official notary seal or seal embosser is the most-used tool for notaries. It’s used to authenticate the notary public’s signature and make the notarial act legitimate. You won’t accomplish much if you don’t have that seal of approval! Make sure your notary stamp follows the guidelines below.

Changes To The Official PA Notary Stamp

The official stamp of the notary (formerly called the notary seal) must contain these items in the following order:

  • The words “Commonwealth of Pennsylvania”**
  • The words “Notary Seal”
  • The name as it appears on the commission of the notary public and the words “Notary Public”
  • The name of the county in which the notary public maintains an office
  • The date the notary public’s commission expires
  • The notary commission number*

**New items that were not necessary until now. Here’s an example of a RULONA-compliant stamp:

The size of the stamp remains the same (a maximum height of 1 inch and a width of 3 ½ inches with a plain border), and the use of an embosser is still optional. These changes aren’t drastic, but you will still have to order new notary stamps for your duties.

Order New PA Notary Stamps Today

We have the approved Pennsylvania notary stamp layout for you to customize on our website. All you have to do is fill out your information and place an order! If you have any questions or concerns, give us a call at 1 (850) 778-2677. We’re here to help. For more information on notary stamps, take a look at our blog about what to do when a notary stamp goes missing. Thanks for stopping by!

Do you work as a notary public in Pennsylvania, or are you training to be one? If so, we want to make sure you’re aware of the major changes instituted by the Revised Uniform Law on Notarial Acts (RULONA), which will take effect on October 26th, 2017. For a full summary of the new law, click here.

Naturally, at Rubber Stamp Station, we’re interested in the changes coming to the official PA notary stamp. The official notary seal or seal embosser is the most-used tool for notaries. It’s used to authenticate the notary public’s signature and make the notarial act legitimate. You won’t accomplish much if you don’t have that seal of approval! Make sure your notary stamp follows the guidelines below.

Changes To The Official PA Notary Stamp

The official stamp of the notary (formerly called the notary seal) must contain these items in the following order:

  • The words “Commonwealth of Pennsylvania”**
  • The words “Notary Seal”
  • The name as it appears on the commission of the notary public and the words “Notary Public”
  • The name of the county in which the notary public maintains an office
  • The date the notary public’s commission expires
  • The notary commission number*

**New items that were not necessary until now. Here’s an example of a RULONA-compliant stamp:

The size of the stamp remains the same (a maximum height of 1 inch and a width of 3 ½ inches with a plain border), and the use of an embosser is still optional. These changes aren’t drastic, but you will still have to order new notary stamps for your duties.

Order New PA Notary Stamps Today

We have the approved Pennsylvania notary stamp layout for you to customize on our website. All you have to do is fill out your information and place an order! If you have any questions or concerns, give us a call at 1 (850) 778-2677. We’re here to help. For more information on notary stamps, take a look at our blog about what to do when a notary stamp goes missing. Thanks for stopping by!

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